PORTUGA | TILES

Tiles arrived in the Iberian Peninsula with Muslim occupation, which used mosaics to cover the walls of their palaces. This new industry develops mainly due to the interest showed by the nobility and the clergy by making great orders to decorate the walls of churches, convents, palaces and gardens. Among the most common representations that can been seen in tiles are historical or mythological episodes, military campaigns, daily or religious scenes. The reconstruction of Lisbon after the earthquake of 1755 seems to have worked as a new impulse in the production of standard tiles, creating what we call nowadays the Pombaline tiles, which were used to decorate the buildings of the new Lisbon. The use of tiles to decorate buildings walls, especially from the nineteenth century on, seems to give a new light to urban landscapes through the reflection (...)

SARDINE

Sardine has been present in meals in the Iberian Peninsula for centuries. It is believed that the Phoenicians and later the Romans salted, guarded and transported this product to all over the Empire. There are reports of the consumption of this fish in Lisbon in the thirteenth century and in 1387, during the reign of King João I, sardine fishing was protected by a royal charter, allowing fishermen to fish in the waters of Lisbon and Setúbal. Among the poorer populations, it was customary to eat the sardines accompanied with bread, in order to make the last one tastier. Centuries later, in 1880, with the invention of the conservation process through heat sterilization, the first sardine canning factory appears in Setúbal. The consumption of this fish led to the fact that, at the beginning of the 20th century, there were around 400 factories (...)

PORTUGAL | SARDINE

Sardine has been present in meals in the Iberian Peninsula for centuries. It is believed that the Phoenicians and later the Romans salted, guarded and transported this product to all over the Empire. There are reports of the consumption of this fish in Lisbon in the thirteenth century and in 1387, during the reign of King João I, sardine fishing was protected by a royal charter, allowing fishermen to fish in the waters of Lisbon and Setúbal. Among the poorer populations, it was customary to eat the sardines accompanied with bread, in order to make the last one tastier. Centuries later, in 1880, with the invention of the conservation process through heat sterilization, the first sardine canning factory appears in Setúbal. The consumption of this fish led to the fact that, at the beginning of the 20th century, there were around 400 factories (...)

TILES

Tiles arrived in the Iberian Peninsula with Muslim occupation, which used mosaics to cover the walls of their palaces. This new industry develops mainly due to the interest showed by the nobility and the clergy by making great orders to decorate the walls of churches, convents, palaces and gardens. Among the most common representations that can been seen in tiles are historical or mythological episodes, military campaigns, daily or religious scenes. The reconstruction of Lisbon after the earthquake of 1755 seems to have worked as a new impulse in the production of standard tiles, creating what we call nowadays the Pombaline tiles, which were used to decorate the buildings of the new Lisbon. The use of tiles to decorate buildings walls, especially from the nineteenth century on, seems to give a new light to urban landscapes through the reflection (...)

PORTUGAL | ELECTRIC TRAM

Traditional trams arrived in Portugal in 1895, the year in which they began to circulate in the city of Porto. Six years later, in 1901, they arrived in Lisbon, in 1904, in Sintra, in 1911, in Coimbra, and finally, in 1914, in Braga. At present, it is only possible to see these vehicles in circulation in Porto, Lisbon and Sintra, where they mainly travel through the oldest parts of those cities, moving on a rail track.

ELECTRIC TRAM

Traditional trams arrived in Portugal in 1895, the year in which they began to circulate in the city of Porto. Six years later, in 1901, they arrived in Lisbon, in 1904, in Sintra, in 1911, in Coimbra, and finally, in 1914, in Braga. At present, it is only possible to see these vehicles in circulation in Porto, Lisbon and Sintra, where they mainly travel through the oldest parts of those cities, moving on a rail track.